Exploring : Route 66 (Part Two)

(for part one, click here)

One day I was watching Keeping Up With the Kardashians (philosophy and critical analysis to be blogged one day soon) and Kris Jenner mentioned that at the end of family vacations she always asked everyone what moment was their “peak” and what was their “pit.” Inspired, I asked my father and sister the same question at the end of our journey. Funny enough, I’ve already forgotten what everybody’s “pit” was because those are the moments that matter the least – but we could all agree that the “peak” was our visit to the City Museum

I knew nothing about St. Louis upon arrival but after visiting I can say with confidence that I would buy a one-way ticket and move there if given the opportunity. It was dramatic and beautiful and the architecture was stunning. The City Museum celebrated my favorite type of art – salvaged art, much of it sourced locally from abandoned buildings. It was a dream that I hope I can soon return to and spend even more time existing in! (Hey City Museum – do you want to hire me?)

Welcome to the City Museum.
Welcome to the City Museum.
There's an old plane that you access by climbing through wire tunnels and a bus hanging off the roof. I hear you can open the door while sitting in the driver's seat, but we didn't get to go up because a thunderstorm started just as we arrived (hence, the ominous clouds).
There’s an old plane that you access by climbing through wire tunnels and a bus hanging off the roof. I hear you can open the door while sitting in the driver’s seat, but we didn’t get to go up because a thunderstorm started just as we arrived (hence, the ominous clouds).

Along with the interactive exhibits, there was architectural salvage and found objects on display.

My heart is beyond capacity, at this point.
Deliriously happy.
Deliriously happy.
A background of Hostess cake baking tins.
A background of Hostess cake baking tins.

Unfortunately the museum had to close for the evening and we made our exit.

Our hotel for the night was the good ol’ Munger Moss. Or “Mr. Moss” according to the sign at night.

 

And soon we were back on the road again.

Obligatory old house photo - can you imagine what it would feel like to call this home??
Obligatory old house photo – can you imagine what it would feel like to call this home??
“Did I just step back in time?”

Route 66 cuts through a corner of Kansas and it just happened to be a corner where a tornado had recently swept through. Us Seattle-ites had no concept of what a tornado looks or feels like, or what it leaves (and doesn’t leave) behind.

We ran into this man, sweeping the sidewalk free of debris, and he enlightened us to what it was like living with tornados - how tornadoes are picky and can destroy a neat row of houses in the middle of a neighborhood or town, which is what happened here.
We ran into this man, sweeping the sidewalk free of debris, and he enlightened us to what it was like living with extreme weather – how tornadoes are picky and can destroy a neat row of houses in the middle of a neighborhood or town, which is what happened here.
Behind us were neighbors already reframing their collapsed house – rebuilding as though it were routine.

After spending only 11 miles in Kansas, we were in Oklahoma. I had been looking forward to Oklahoma and it’s another place I’d like to spend more time in someday.

Ed Galloway's Totem Pole Park - a roadside attraction featuring my second favorite type of art: folk art.
Ed Galloway’s Totem Pole Park – a roadside attraction featuring my second favorite type of art: folk art.

Like Missouri, the scenery made me jump awkwardly for joy:

 

Next stop: The Blue Whale of Catoosa (interesting fact: the Blue Whale was the site of the 11/11 launch of Snapchat Spectacles)

And now for some scenes of general Route 66 and its beautifully abandoned nature:

The Cotton Boll Motel of Canute, OK.
The Cotton Boll Motel of Canute, OK.

(Don’t worry, there’s more.)
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2 thoughts on “Exploring : Route 66 (Part Two)

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